Morning Coffee 122


  • Sorry for the posting lag. Had a few technical difficulties around here. In the process of moving hosts, so expect more glitches.
  • My talk at the p&p Summit on Monday went really well. At least, it felt good and the applause at the end felt genuine. I recorded the audio on my laptop, so I’ll be posting a Silverlight version as soon as I figure out how to adjust the levels so their somewhat consistent. Paraesthesia and #2872 have reactions.
  • Speaking of the p&p Summit, Scott Hanselman posted his ASP.NET MVC demo from his talk. Said ASP.NET MVC bits aren’t available yet, so you can’t, you know, run the demo for yourself. But at least you can review what the ASP.NET MVC code will look like.
  • I stopped by the SOA/BPM conference last week and saw Jon, Sam and Jesus among others. Spent quite a bit of time talking to Sam and his Neudesic colleagues about this “physically distributed/logically centralized” approach that I think is hogwash. It sounds to me like Neudesic approach is really federated not centralized, though I’m not sure David Pallmann would agree. Federated makes much more sense to me than centralized.
  • Nick Malik continues his series on SOA Business Operations Model. I especially like his point that this isn’t a series of choices, you need to “look at your companyand try to understand which model the business has selected. ”
  • The first CTP of PowerShell 2.0 is out! Check out what’s new on the PowerShell team blog and Jeffrey Snover’s TechEd Presentation. (via Sam Gentile)
  • Soma announced updates to VC++ coming next year, including TR1 support and a “major” MFC upgrade to support creating native apps that look like Office, IE or VS. I get supporting TR1, but the idea that people are clamoring for MFC updates is kinda surprising. Many years ago when I first came to MSFT, a friend asked “But don’t you hate Microsoft?” to which I responded “No, I just hate MFC”. Obviously, not everyone agrees with that sentiment.
  • Steve Vinoski thinks there’s no hope for IT. Funny, I keep agreeing with Steve’s overall point but disagreeing with his reasoning. I still don’t buy the serendipity argument. I like compiled languages. And I think he’s overstating the amount of “real, useful guidance” for REST floating around. Basically, there’s “the book“.
  • In widely reported news, Windows Live launched their next generation services. Don’t bother with the press release, just go to the new WL home page.
  • Speaking of WL, Dare Obasanjo points to the Live Data Interactive SDK page where you can experiment with the WL Contacts REST API. It gives you a good sense of how the Web3S protocol works. Pretty well, IMO. However, how come WL Contacts Schema doesn’t include some type of update timestamp for sync purposes? If you wanted to build say a Outlook <–> WL Contacts sync engine, you’d have to download the entire address book and grovel thru it for changes every sync.
  • Speaking of Web3S, I’d love to see some info on how one might implement a service using Web3S. Yaron Goland positions Web3S as an alternative to APP that WL developed because they “couldn’t make APP work in any sane way for our scenarios”. I’m sure other folks have similar scenarios.